RADIO-EMAIL SYSTEM OVERVIEW

and

AIRMAIL DOWNLOADING AND TELNET SETUP,
OPTIONS MESSAGES, NTS BATCH FILES

 

On this page:

 

1. WINLINK 2000 RADIO-EMAIL OVERVIEW

1.1. ROUTING - ADDRESSING

2. CLIENT COMPONENTS

2.1. AIRMAIL CLIENT

2.2. PACLINK CLIENT

3. WINLINK 2000 SYSTEM COMPONENTS

3.1. RMS-PACKET GATEWAYS

3.2. RMS-HF GATEWAYS

3.3. RMS-RELAY SERVER

3.4. SWITCHES - BACKBONES - DIGI-PEATERS

3.5. CENTRAL MESSAGE SERVERS

4. WINLINK 2000 IN THE LAST MILE

4.1. LOCAL AREA NETWORKING

4.2. LOCAL AREA NETWORK EXAMPLE DIAGRAMS

5. ARES/NTS INTERFACE

5.1. RADIO-EMAIL, RADIOGRAMS AND WELFARE TRAFFIC

5.2. NATIONAL EMERGENCY COMMUNICATIONS BACKUP

6. AIRMAIL TELNET INFORMATION

6.1. DOWNLOADING - GETTING STARTED

6.2. AIRMAIL NOTES

6.3. TELNET SETTINGS, CMS

6.4. ORIGINATING A NEW MESSAGE, STEPS 1- 2 - 3

6.5. ATTACHING A FILE TO A NEW MESSAGE

6.6. ORIGINATING A MESSAGE, STEPS 4-9

6.7. MESSAGE READY TO POST

6.8. REPLIES

6.9. TO SEND/RECEIVE VIA TELNET

6.10. MESSAGE INDEX AND WINDOWS

7. OPTIONS MESSAGES

7.1. OPTIONS MESSAGE MENU

7.2. OPTIONS WIZARD

7.3. OPTIONS MESSAGE

7.4. PACLINK OPTIONS MESSAGE

8. WHITELIST OPERATION

9. MESSAGE CLASSES

9.1 CLASS 1 - STANDARD ARRL TEXT RADIOGRAMS

9.2 CLASS 2 - RADIO-EMAIL - WITH NETWORK ADDRESSES

9.3 CLASS 3 - RADIO-EMAIL - NO NETWORK ADDRESS (NEW)

9.4 CLASS 4 - RADIO-EMAIL AND RADIOGRAMS FOR RE-FILING (NEW)

10. NTS RADIOGRAM BATCH FILE FORMAT

10.1 EXAMPLE - BATCH FILE MESSAGES:

11. TARGET STATIONS

11.1 SECTION TARGETS

11.2 NTS - NTSD TARGETS

 

1. WINLINK 2000 RADIO-EMAIL OVERVIEW

The Winlink 2000 (WL2K) global network is an amateur radio system providing the means to send messages in regular email format over radio links. Since radio can bridge areas in which there is communications infrastructure loss, the system provides the means to recover email service in such areas for all users. Email messaging is the common denominator used by all served agencies hence the WL2K system provides the means to ensure total interoperability between all those agencies we serve as well as for our own responders and staff. This attribute is very well suited to modern incident command strategies.


Amateurs and officials alike are familiar with creating and sending emails. The WL2K system uses email applications for the client user interface and the process of sending and receiving mail is similar to using any internet service provider. Not only can radio-email now be sent when the telephone system and internet are down in an affected area, but officials may send such mail from their own computers at their own desks or in the field, with amateur radio operator supervision, through our stations. This is what our served agencies need.


The WL2K network operates as a global email server for all user clients which can access the system over radio links and the internet. It can handle email between all connecting clients and exchange email with addressees on the public internet through a filtered and secure interface. The WL2K network consists of a global set of mirrored Central Message Servers (CMS) which can be reached via internet, local packet Gateways and HF PacTor Gateways throughout the country. Gateway interconnections with the CMS go directly over the internet and not through your personal email account servers. The system also provides valuable weather, location information and system bulletins for all users. WL2K system radio-email is also compressed to reduce spectrum use and to enhance privacy.


Radio-email on WL2K may contain multiple addressees and multiple copies, and may contain binary attachments limited in size only by the speed of the radio links in use or the options set by the user. WL2K radio-email generally moves quickly around the world with delivery times to the addressee’s mailbox or ISP within a few minutes or less.

 

If you have ever tried to check your email and found the telephone line, DSL, or cable ISP connection or email server out of service, or gone into the field as an ARES®/NTS operator where those services are not available, WL2K provides the solution to recover email service. WL2K radio-email now allows amateur emergency communications operators to provide relevant services in our modern IT world.

 

The internet Winlink 2000 home page is at: http://www.winlink.org/

 

 1.1. ROUTING - ADDRESSING

A powerful feature of WL2K is that the routing of all email is automatic and dynamic. A client can connect to any of the system radio Gateways (RMS-Packet, RMS-HF), or via the internet, and exchange mail with any other client in the system or with public internet addressees. Client stations may move about and connect via any link path to any available WL2K port and email will be automatically forwarded to that client.

 

The WL2K system is an email transport system, not a BBS system in the customary packet radio sense. You must have a specific address to send mail to a client on the network or on the public internet. The recipient on WL2K or the public internet may reply to your mail sent from WL2K. Access from the public internet to your account on WL2K is protected by your account’s automatic white list. See Whitelist Operation, for details.


Paclink clients may register or cancel Tactical Addresses with the CMS over the internet. Radio-email for a Tactical Address is routed by associated call sign to the Paclink client station which has registered that address. Since an internet connection is required for registration, such addresses should be set up prior to an emergency in which the Paclink station’s internet connection may no longer available. Tactical Addresses allow officials to use more recognizable alphanumeric address aliases from an amateur supplied address book to prepare their radio-email messaging rather than being forced to know call signs.


Clients on the WL2K network may be addressed globally as follows:

For all clients:

[call sign]@winlink.org, or

[username]@domain.ext, a valid public internet address.

 

For Paclink clients:

[call sign]@winlink.org, or [call sign-ssid]@winlink.org, or

[Tactical Address]@winlink.org, registered to a particular Paclink client.

[username]@domain.ext, a valid public internet address, or

 

AirMail and Paclink client software recognize ssids and WL2K preserves them through the system. Thus separate call sign ssids may be used to identify separate TNC/radio combinations used for connections via the Paclink automatic channels. Each call sign plus ssid is treated as a separate account on the network.

 

A Paclink station using a WL2K account such as w1aw-3 will receive email addressed to the w1aw-3 email account plus any of its registered Tactical Addresses. Officials linked to that Paclink client computer will each receive the messages for their respective Tactical Address when they check for mail (Paclink acts like a local email server, storing incoming radio-email waiting for a connection from the official’s email application). The mail for w1aw-3 would be delivered to the email application account identified as w1aw-3.


Tactical Addresses are limited to between 3 and 12 characters in length. The first characters must be letters. Figures may be included only after the insertion of a first hyphen, as in: MDCBACOEOC, MDCBACO-HOS2, MDCBACOH-2, MDCPRGE-3, MDC-SM, MDCARC-DLU, etc. The current protocol calls for the first letters for ARES® to be the ARRL Section designator, as in “MDC”, typically followed by the county designator and any additional specific identifiers. NTS nets or target stations use: NTSMDC, NTSMDC-MEPN, NTSMDCMDD-2, NTS-3RN, etc. WL2K system software will not permit registering duplicate Tactical Addresses with Paclink. Consult with the STM regarding the national Tactical Address Protocol.

 

 

2. CLIENT COMPONENTS

All email messages on the WL2K system are exchanged with client stations via a series of redundant mirrored Central Message Servers (CMS) or local RMS-Relay servers. The CMS servers also control the gateway to the public internet. The CMS servers may be reached by clients via telnet over the internet, RMS-Packet Gateways (the old Telpac) for VHF/UHF/WiFi packet radio clients, or RMS-HF PacTor Gateways.

 

The WL2K system uses two different client software programs, Paclink and AirMail (see below), both provided at no charge for ARRL Field Organization use by the Winlink Development Team and KE6RK respectively. Additional software components are provided to aid in building networks capable of withstanding infrastructure loss within our jurisdictions.


A disaster area in which the normal telephone and data link infrastructure is degraded or lost is referred to as the “last mile.”

 

2.1. AIRMAIL CLIENT

Any amateur operator in ARES® or NTS/NTSD can access the system as an email client using free AirMail software with a modest computer (Windows95™ or later). AirMail is available from the Downloads ham page at http://www.airmail2000.com, installed in a few minutes (see instructions below), and used to exchange email via the web connection of an ISP (the email application and Telnet/Internet driver are built into AirMail). With the addition of a basic packet KISS TNC and a VHF/UHF radio, and/or a PacTor modem and HF radio, the operator can bridge across the “last mile” where the telephone service and internet are down. This is a very modest equipment list allowing ARES® teams to deploy the technology at minimal cost, particularly in VHF/UHF local environments - perhaps no cost for existing packet stations.

 

 Fig. 1

AirMail, shown installed on a notebook or PC, can access the system via 1) the internet, 2) VHF/UHF packet radio, or 3) HF radio (using PacTor-I or the SCS PTC-II PacTor-II/III HF modem) for use in remote areas.

 

Fig. 2

AirMail may also be used station-to-station to exchange messages. Such emails may be automatically downloaded by the addressed client when the stations connect, and may be manually forwarded into the WL2K system or public internet by the receiving station.

 

2.2. PACLINK CLIENT

The Paclink client software (operating on, XP Home/Pro, or Vista, using “Dot Net” framework 2 or later) provides a robust email client and server program using an operator interface email application such as Outlook Express™, Outlook™, Eudora™, etc. Paclink may be used as a stand-alone client using any standard email application. It is addressed as [call sign]@winlink.org (plus ssid if needed) and may also register Tactical Addresses. Paclink also provides an HF interface to permit connecting to an RMS-HF Gateway with the appropriate modem.

Fig. 3

 

Fig. 4

The Paclink module allows officials to connect to the system through the Paclink station as remote clients using the email applications on their own computers (using an additional email account each with a unique Tactical Address). The Paclink module, in other words, provides an smtp/POP3 server for the associated email applications, and a connection side to manage the internet and radio connections. Paclink automatically tries the assigned connection channels in order to find a functioning route.


Paclink stations can access the Winlink system CMSs via telnet/internet, or using VHF/UHF/WiFi packet radio via RMS-Packet Gateways, or HF PacTor via RMS-HF Gateways. The added AGW Packet Engine (AGWPE) software provides the interface for automatic multiple connection channels and a number of different TNCs for radio connections. Use of the Paclink module and multi-channel radio connections is transparent to the email user.

 

 

3. WINLINK 2000 SYSTEM COMPONENTS

3.1. RMS-PACKET GATEWAYS

The RMS-Packet module (XP/Vista & Dot Net 2 or later, replacing the older Telpac software for W98™+) provides a packet radio link between client VHF/UHF/WiFi/DD stations and a telnet/internet connection to the CMSs or an RMS-Relay module. An RMS-Packet Gateway may be co-located at a client station or at a separate secured site, in order to provide AirMail and Paclink clients with access to the WL2K CMSs. RMS-Packet also works with AGWPE (multiple TNC driver utility) to provide multiple radio channel connections.

Fig. 5


RMS-Packet Gateways may be set up ad-hoc in the field anywhere an internet connection can be established (such as at Wireless Access Points). Home station, mobile, or portable Node Switches or digi-peaters (see below) may be used to provide a radio path to a functioning RMS-Packet Gateway. It is helpful to establish a number of RMS-Packet Gateway resources within an ARES® jurisdiction - each on a separate telephone exchange and/or ISP (easily done by equipping many home stations with both client and RMS-Packet software running on the same computer and sharing the TNC/radio). Note that the ISP service required is used to reach the internet and not to access the owner’s ISP email account. RMS-Packet Gateways may also provide the CMS connection through a co-located RMS-Relay server module (see below).

 

3.2. RMS-HF GATEWAYS

The WL2K system has deployed a number of RMS-HF Gateway stations throughout the US and elsewhere. These HF PacTor stations, listed on the Winlink home page, often scan multiple frequencies on multiple bands in order to provide gateway service to the CMS for HF clients in the field from virtually anywhere.

Fig. 6

These “public” RMS-HF Gateways usually operate Pactor-II/III with SCS modems, but may have some frequencies accepting PacTor-I connections, or may allow such during emergency situations. (Consult with the sysops as needed.) RMS-HF Gateways may be set up within the ARES® LAN environment to provide HF client service to the CMS. This is a separate function from the use of HF with RMS-Relay servers (see below).

 

3.3. RMS-RELAY SERVER

Fig. 7

The RMS-Relay Server Module provides a robust means to continue client service in the ARES® LAN during loss of infrastructure. The module is installed along with the RMS-Packet module at a packet Gateway site.

·        Clients connect via the RMS-Packet Gateway (1), either co-located or tied in via a TCP/IP link. The RMS-Relay normally passes those connections through to the WL2K CMS via a telnet/internet connection.

·        AirMail (A) and Paclink (P) clients connect to the RMS-Packet Gateway directly or through a backbone (2) when they lose their own internet connections.

·        If the telnet/internet connection from the RMS-Relay to the CMS fails, however, the RMS-Relay automatically reverts to a message server for all its known clients, i.e., it provides for fully automatic radio-email service among all those clients connecting to it via packet directly or though the backbone.

·        In addition, while the internet is down, the RMS-Relay provides for a manually established HF link (3) to any RMS-HF Gateway station with a functioning CMS connection in order to handle messages to the rest of the WL2K system, including the CMS Gateway to the public internet.

·        Note that the RMS-Relay may be co-located with and operate on the same computer with a WL2K client application and RMS-Packet Gateway. Except for its HF module, the RMS-Relay works internally on the computer to provide telnet interconnections to the Gateway module and the telnet/internet link to the CMS. When the RMS-Relay loses its telnet connection to the CMS it automatically operates as a “stand-alone” message server for its known clients, thus it provides for a fully automatic radio-email service in a local or county LAN when infrastructure is lost.

 

3.4. SWITCHES - BACKBONES - DIGI-PEATERS

Switches (Nodes): Packet switch software such as the FPAC (DOS or DOS window) or ROSE (hardware) node switches can bridge packets between two different frequencies in order to facilitate the construction of backbone links between WL2K resources.

 

Backbones: Backbone links permit clients in a jurisdiction within the “last mile” (no internet service) to make connections into neighboring areas or jurisdictions where RMS-Packet Gateways with internet service are operating. Such an RMS-Packet Gateway may be co-located with an RMS-Relay module. An RMS-Relay server module may also reside on a TCP/IP backbone where it can be reached via an RMS-Packet Gateway from within the “last mile”. Any RMS-Packet Gateway with the RMS-Relay module, reachable on the backbone, can provide automatic radio-email service for all such clients when the internet is not available.


Digi-peaters
may also be set up ad-hoc as needed to relay clients to a RMS-Packet Gateway although at reduced throughput since packets must be repeated on the same frequency. Many TNCs permit digi-peating using the internal hardware which may be enabled separately from the KISS mode packet operation with a computer.

 

Fig. 8

·        1) The LAN clients reach WL2K via a local switch to a backbone then a second switch to the RMS-Packet Gateway. The RMS-Packet Gateway might also have been co-located at the Switch 2 location, thus freeing up a radio and TNC for another leg of the backbone.

·        2) In a co-located RMS-Packet Gateway and Switch, if the RMS-Packet Gateway (w1aw-10) at the site loses its internet service, the client stations on the LAN can connect to the Switch (w1aw-12) using the separate call sign dash number (ssid). The Switch will then relay the client’s packets over the backbone (w1aw-5) to a functioning RMS-Packet Gateway elsewhere. The same method may be used for an RMS-Packet Gateway and Switch co-located at a client station. AGWPE permits defining multiple connections along the way, including expected response scripts, to reach through many nodes of the backbone.

·        3) The RMS-Relay Server Module may also be installed at an RMS-Packet location in order to provide a server for automatic email service if internet service is lost.

 

3.5. CENTRAL MESSAGE SERVERS

The WL2K system consists of a number of mirrored Central Message Servers (CMS) managed by the system administrators. Each of these servers is connected via secured internet connections to all Gateways and Relays in the system, and through a spam and virus filtering firewall to the public internet. Other bulletin and tracking information is also made available through CMS services. Clients may also set parameters for spam filtering (white list) and attachment size, etc., through system messages sent to the CMS. Any one of the mirrored CMS units in the US or around the world can sustain the operation of the WL2K system.

 

 

4. WINLINK 2000 IN THE LAST MILE

4.1. LOCAL AREA NETWORKING

Building radio local area networks to connect everyone to the system and to tie our clients together when the telephones lines and internet are down lets all of us exchange email over radio as easily as clicking “send” on our email program. Such LANs should be designed to withstand loss of infrastructure within the “last mile”. This also gives the ARRL a common communications layer to fully integrate the operations of all ARES®, NTS and NTSD services nation-wide. The objective is always to provide total agency interoperability for all government, non-government and amateur staff operations.


AirMail and Paclink client software provide home stations and ARES® stations deployed into the field or at served agencies a means to exchange radio-email via WL2K when the local phone line or internet service is not available.


Deploying as many RMS-Packet Gateways within a jurisdiction as possible, each on a separate phone exchange for dial-up or DSL, and using as many different ISPs as possible, makes for a robust Local Area Network for WL2K clients. ARES® stations deployed into the field anywhere within the jurisdiction should be able to find RMS-Packet Gateways or backbone switch stations in range. Speed is of the essence. Consider using UHF 9600b portals or even 802.11 hubs for these purposes. The later permits moving TCP/IP packets over the network, thus enabling VOIP, IRLP, Echolink, and other TCP/IP linked applications.


With access to backbone resources, a functioning RMS-Packet Gateway may be reached outside the “last mile” of infrastructure loss. ARES® RMS-Relays established on such backbones, or in the radio Local Area Network at Gateways, can provide radio-email service between all radio-connected clients even with total loss of “last mile” internet infrastructure. Again, a backbone using 802.11 links can provide for large amounts of WL2K traffic and multiple application links.


In remote areas or small towns, the local network can be set up with RMS-Packet Gateways on 2 meters, UHF 9600b, or 802.11; and may include an RMS-Relay as a local server with the HF link to the outside world. Both the RMS-Relay Server Module and client stations on HF permit establishing a link to any distant RMS-HF Gateway to reach the CMSs. As a backup, AirMail clients anywhere in the local domain can move radio-email using station-to-station forwarding on packet radio, or short or long haul via HF PacTor.


A Paclink client at a shelter or field command post may be used to provide radio-email service to official’s computers on site using convenient alphanumeric Tactical Addresses registered before an emergency (see 1.1, Routing-Addressing). The Paclink client established at fixed agency sites may also be linked via Ethernet, WiFi, or other LAN interconnections to all the agency computer’s email accounts inside or outside the agency server firewall. For security reasons, such an ARES® Paclink client is usually set up outside the agency LAN firewall, and is assigned an IP address at which the LAN officials exchange their mail using a devoted account on their email applications.


Therefore:

  • A client can provide radio-email service from any shelter or command post via any RMS-Packet Gateway, even if only a few blocks or miles away. This is a very typical and easily accomplished local ARES® deployment.
  • A client able to reach a functioning RMS-Packet Gateway anywhere directly or via a backbone radio link can provide radio-email service from within the “last mile”.
  • Radio-email service for all radio-connected clients within the “last mile” may be sustained by an RMS-Relay Server even with no internet connection. An HF link may be established from the RMS-Relay to an RMS-HF Gateway outside the “last mile” for full network service.
  • AirMail and Paclink clients can provide radio-email service via HF PacTor radio from anywhere to any RMS-HF Gateway in the US.
  • AirMail clients can exchange radio-email client-to-client via packet or HF PacTor.
  • A client able to reach the WL2K system from within the “last mile” can recover email service to the public internet for all agency and amateur users, and provide welfare radio-email services for the public to and from the public internet.
  • Any client can generate ARRL Radiogram traffic and transport it via radio-email to any other station, or to NTSD MBOs using the Batch File format, for those public or agency messages which do not have WL2K or internet addresses. Such traffic may be exchanged via WL2K with local NTS stations in the area or exchanged with NTS/NTSD stations nation-wide, all without using any intermediate relaying manpower.
  • Once WL2K radio-email stations are deployed to agencies and the field, the officials themselves may exchange email with virtually no learning curve and without having to work through the third party resident amateurs for message creation. Custom agency message forms may be included in body text or attachments.

 

  • For radio-email traffic no intermediate ARES® manpower or nets are required to relay the traffic within or to points outside the “last mile”;

 

  • By providing radio-email to all served agencies (government, non-government - MARS, NWS, USCG, Military, FEMA, etc.) the ARRL Field Organization can now provide for total agency interoperability during disasters.

 

4.2. LOCAL AREA NETWORK EXAMPLE DIAGRAMS

 

Fig. 9  Three Counties Linked via Backbone

 

All client stations may use telnet connections over the internet where available to reach the WL2K network at maximum speed and to avoid radio congestion - the default connection mode. The local area network (LAN) and backbones provide the means to reach outside the “last mile” to sustain full radio-email service and the means to reach public internet addressees through the CMS as needed. Establishing an ARES® RMS-Relay within the LAN, or reachable via backbone, ensures that all radio-connected clients within the “last mile” can exchange email during infrastructure loss. LANs and backbones may use high speed interconnections such as 802.11b, Demarc, or DStar DD links, etc., to achieve high speed service.

 

Fig. 10  Two Remote Counties Linked via Backbone and HF Relay to Other Areas

 

Two counties in a remote part of a Section can provide automatic radio-email service for all their LAN clients with or without internet service. When possible, a radio link between them can provide for LAN clients in one county to use the RMS-Packet Gateway in the other if the internet is available there. If both counties lose infrastructure, automatic radio-email between local clients is sustained by each RMS-Relay. Either or both may evoke an HF connection through their RMS-Relay servers to a WL2K RMS-HF Gateway anywhere in the country in order to reach addressees on the WL2K system or public internet, including other jurisdictions anywhere in the Section.

 

The link to other counties may be extended using FPAC or Rose Node switches, or even digi-peaters (with reduced speed). County-to-county links may be on bands not used by the local area networks to avoid mutual interference. A single remote jurisdiction may operate as shown for one of the counties above, eliminating the county links and Node equipment, and using the RMS-Packet, RMS-Relay and HF link for handling traffic internally and with other areas. The RMS-Relay, RMS-Packet and Node equipment may share a single computer with a client software package and link to official’s computers. Such stations installed at hardened sites such as EOCs can provide the LAN services, or can be located elsewhere with high speed linking to the EOC. In addition, AirMail clients with packet or HF PacTor can be used to forward radio-email messaging from one to the other, thus permitting relays outside of the “last mile” to stations which can “re-file” the messages onto WL2K or the internet.

 

 

5. ARES/NTS INTERFACE

5.1. RADIO-EMAIL, RADIOGRAMS AND WELFARE TRAFFIC

AirMail or Paclink may be used to send agency email messages and public welfare traffic with network addresses directly to the destination ISPs or WL2K clients in full email format for automatic delivery and responses.


If public internet or WL2K addresses are not available, batches of text and welfare traffic in NTS Radiogram format (in the email body text or in an attachment) may be sent within and out of the “last mile” to ARES® or NTS/NTSD stations set up on WL2K for handling and delivery. Stations in or near the “last mile” can receive batched text and welfare inquiry traffic from outside the area (at the discretion of local staff) to be archived and delivered locally or to be serviced by agencies managing shelters.


ARRL radiograms may be transferred in plain text via WL2K radio-email to any ARES® or NTS station. Consult with the Section Traffic Manager for the Target Stations in the NTSD using the Batch File format for bulk transfer of NTS Radiograms via radio-email. The file format is shown below at NTS Radiogram Batch File Format.

 

CONFIRMATION: All radio-email carrying radiograms (in plain text or Batch File Format) should contain a request to “please HXC this email” in the subject line to request confirmation via reply mail of receipt by the targeted recipient station.

 

·        Thus, for inbound or outbound agency and welfare radiogram text traffic carried by radio-email, no intermediate ARES® or NTS manpower or nets are required to relay the traffic within or to points outside the “last mile”.

 

5.2. NATIONAL EMERGENCY COMMUNICATIONS BACKUP

 

·        The NTS has developed the means to move radio-email traffic, including email format messaging as well as radiogram Batch Files, anywhere in the US “radio-all-the-way” within minutes to back up all systems.

 

·        The common radio-email communications layer provided by WL2K establishes the ready means for the integration of all ARES® and NTS/NTSD operations nation-wide in a cooperative EMCOMM effort.

 

  

6. AIRMAIL TELNET INFORMATION

AirMail downloading and installation information is provided here to encourage all ARES® and NTS/NTSD stations to become so equipped. AirMail is easy to install and to begin using over the internet with its own built-in email application and the built-in telnet driver. This will establish all local ARES® and NTS/NTSD stations on the common WL2K server system. The addition of RMS-Packet Gateways within each ARES® jurisdiction will provide the means to sustain radio-email during periods of local loss of infrastructure as each AirMail user installs a TNC and radio. Stations at home or at agency sites may also then add the SCS modem for PacTor II/III HF connections to distant RMS-HF Gateways. The drivers for the SCS modem are built into AirMail.

 

6.1. DOWNLOADING - GETTING STARTED

 

1. Go to http://www.airmail2000.com, select “Downloads”, and then select the “Ham” Download link.

 

2. On the Ham Download page read the download “direct to hard drive” or “download to floppy disk” sections and follow the instructions of choice.

 

3. Click the desired download link. A window will open to allow selecting the destination folder on your computer. Select “My Received Files” or a folder of choice, and then click “Save.” The amhc33081.exe (or later) file will be downloaded when you select the “Ham Client complete install” link.

 

4. When the file is on board, double click the .exe file in the folder to begin the installation. The default location for installing AirMail on most recent machines is “C:\Program Files\airmail.” Follow the installation wizard instructions including making an icon on your desktop for AirMail.

 

5. Launch AirMail. If a first time run wizard pops up enter the default information for your call, etc., and a telnet connection per the slide regarding telnet settings (below). Telnet settings may be checked or changed later at any time from within the telnet/internet module (click Modules on the main menu, select internet access). Telnet settings must be installed, and your computer must have a connection to the internet, before using AirMail to send or receive radio-email. See the section below on Telnet Settings, CMS.

 

6. When ready, you may create a test message to your home email address or a known Winlink 2000 client. (See the instruction figures below, but you can not send a message to your own winlink.org address.) Establish a connection to your ISP, open the Internet Access module on AirMail (Modules on the tool bar, or Lightning Icon) and click the green “Send” button. AirMail will connect to the designated CMS telnet server and automatically upload and download your messages, and then AirMail will automatically disconnect. Your message to your regular internet email address or Winlink 2000 client should arrive shortly. Any new incoming WL2K messages will be downloaded and visible in the AirMail Message Index, Inbox.

 

7. Welcome to AirMail and WL2K! Tools/Options and/or a setup wizard are available for setting up packet and HF modules. Note that there is a limited packet TNC list selectable for VHF/UHF - the drivers are built-in. The drivers for operation with the SCS PTC-II HF PacTor modems are included. It is well worth the time to read through the extensive help files to learn all the features of this powerful AirMail communications program.

 

6.2. AIRMAIL NOTES

 

1. ATTACHMENT SIZE:

The WL2K system defaults new users to zero (0) attachment size for incoming email. Read the AirMail instructions for sending an Options message to the system to set the desired non-zero limit for incoming attachments. See the instructions below for using Options Messages.

 

2. COURTESY:

Always remember to listen on packet or PacTor frequencies before attempting to connect to RMS-Packet or RMS-HF stations. This is a basic amateur operating courtesy as well as regulation. Set SCS and other modems to ID if they fail to connect.

 

3. DIGI-PEATING:

On AirMail packet connections via digi-peaters (beyond one which may be entered on the port connect line), or nodes, the link must be manually established via keyboard mode. Once on a backbone able to reach an RMS-Packet Gateway the automatic handshaking for WL2K applies. When done disconnect from the intermediate stations manually as required.

 

4. AIRMAIL HF PACTOR:

Operation on HF is customarily done with PacTor III (3,600b/s) although there may be a few RMS-HF Gateways still supporting PacTor I (~200b/s). Most will accept PacTor I during emergencies upon request although this mode is very slow and limits the number of users per frequency, and it is impractical for all but the smallest attachments.

 

5. AIRMAIL PACKET - SUPPORTED TNCS:

AirMail supports a limited packet TNC list for VHF/UHF use. See the AirMail menu; Tools - Options - Modules - VHF Packet Client - Setup window; Connection - TNC type. Also, to initialize the TNC, there must be no COM port conflicts. When AirMail is started it initializes your TNC, and when AirMail is closed, it returns the TNC to prior settings.

 

6. WHITE LIST:

WL2K automatically enables a white list on the CMS system to filter messages coming into the system from the public internet. Each time you send a message out to the internet from within the WL2K system, the username and domain of the addressee is stored automatically in your white list. This enables that addressee to send mail back to you at your winlink.org address. Other mail from the internet is blocked unless you send a message to the system to add domains or user’s addresses to your white list to permit messages from the internet to come into your account. See the instructions below for Whitelist Operation.

 

7. USB - COM PORT CONNECTIONS

Many recent computers and laptops may only have USB ports available for TNC connections. A USB to COM port adapter cable (single or multiple COM ports) may be used (such as the Keyspan USB to COM port dongle).

 

 

6.3. TELNET SETTINGS, CMS

 (Check the Winlink home page and bulletins for updates to the CMS settings information.)

 

 

Using a CMS Telnet server over the internet, when available, will speed up your send-receive transactions. It does not matter which CMS Telnet server you use - all CMS sites are mirrored regularly. Excerpts from the development team global catalog file:

 

 

“With the new CMS Telnet system, for small home systems, there is usually not a need to open any port for a home router/firewall system since this method only uses outgoing initiated port 8772. For those who "TIME OUT," look to insure that port 8772 TCP is open.” (For outbound connections, ed.)

...

“Remember, Telnet is just a convenient substitute for the primary use of this system. HF radio, using the Pactor protocols and VHF/UHF using AX.25 Packet, D-STAR, and 802.11 are the primary paths for Winlink 2000 use.”

 

“Steve, K4CJX”

“For the Winlink 2000 Development Team”

 

 

After installation you may check the telnet settings in the telnet module at any time using the Settings button. You must enter a valid legal call sign in the Local Callsign box.

 

Other WL2K Gateways may also provide telnet service until replaced by the new RMS modules (now virtually complete). Consult the sysop for particulars and enter the appropriate Remote Callsign, Remote Host address and any special Password the Gateway sysop may require. You may set up a number of choices which will then be selectable using the Connect to drop down box. (Gateway station information is available on http://www.winlink.org)

  

 

6.4. ORIGINATING A NEW MESSAGE, STEPS 1- 2 - 3

 

You may send messages to a number of addressees. Mixed address types are permitted in the To line and in the Cc line, call signs at winlink.org or valid public internet addresses, each separated by a comma. Tactical alpha-numeric addresses may be used by Paclink users to send email to such clients associated and registered with a Paclink station on the WL2K network. You may not address a message to the winlink.org address from which you are sending the message.

 

To add a new client to your address book, click New on the wizard shown above and an editing wizard will appear. Enter the client’s call sign in the Name line, and the [call sign]@winlink.org into the To line, then click OK. Select the desired client(s) in the address book to automatically enter the addressee(s) into your message, and then click OK. Only the call sign (name) will appear in the message To line. The “winlink.org” is automatically entered in the actual message from the address book (To line in the New wizard). You can also just click Cancel on the wizard above and go directly to the message form, but any address you enter there must be the full address, i.e., call sign@winlink.org, or a valid internet address in full, each new address separated by a comma from the last.

 

 

6.5. ATTACHING A FILE TO A NEW MESSAGE

 

·       With the new message editor open select File, Attach File from the main menu and a window will open to permit selecting a file to attach to the message. Select a file from the selected folder, browse, or type in a file name. Press Open to attach the file to the message.

·       Similarly select File, Import/Export-Import and you may import a text file into the body of the new message.

·       Note: Incoming email with an attachment will display an icon at the bottom of the message reader. You may click it to display it or right-click it to save it to disk. Remember that you must have set (with an Options Message) your system attachment size above zero to receive attachments.

 

 

6.6. ORIGINATING A MESSAGE, STEPS 4-9

 

 

6.7. MESSAGE READY TO POST

 

A message as it might look with an attachment just prior to “posting.”

 

6.8. REPLIES

You may initiate a reply to a message two ways: 1) With the original message opened by double clicking the message in the Message Index, click the Down Arrow (“U” turn) icon (format a reply message) in the tool bar. The original message window will be closed and a reply message window will open; or 2) With the original message selected (highlighted) in the Message Index, click the Message item in the main menu and then click Reply (or Ctrl-R).

 

In both cases, when the message is ready to send, click the Post icon in the tool bar (mail box icon - post the current message for sending) and the message will be posted in the Outbox. It will be sent on the next poll or by initiating a connection with the telnet/internet module or a radio module.

 

 

6.9. TO SEND/RECEIVE VIA TELNET

 

 

 

6.10. MESSAGE INDEX AND WINDOWS

 

Note that when AirMail boots up the Message Index window is maximized within the AirMail window. Opening a message or the new message editor will open a new maximized window obscuring the Message Index. The Escape key will close any such windows to return to the Message Index. Click the double-page icon in the menu text bar (red circle below) to allow each of the windows to be shown and sized separately.

 

 

Doing this will result in the display of separate windows as shown below, each selected by clicking within their boundaries or in the title bar in customary fashion. Multiple messages may be opened and viewed simultaneously in this manner.

 

 

 

7. OPTIONS MESSAGES

7.1. OPTIONS MESSAGE MENU

 

To originate an options message click on Window, WL2K and then click Options Message. A wizard will open to create the options message as shown below.

 

7.2. OPTIONS WIZARD

 

Fill in the Attachment limit in bytes, no commas. (Select size based upon your mode of connection keeping in mind the transfer rate and connect time required.) Clicking Query only will simply ask the system to report back your current settings. (Checking the Show hints box will enable help information as you move the mouse over each window. See Options Message in the AirMail help file for more information.) Check that the Send Via box shows WL2K.


Recommended attachment sizes:

Pactor 1 = 10000 Max

Pactor 2 = 40000 Max

Pactor 3 = 80000 Max

1200 baud Packet = 12000 Max (depending upon your local packet LAN capacity)

9600 baud Packet = 99000 Max

Telnet CMS direct = 100000 Max (depending upon your ISP connection speed)


Leave the Prefix and Suffix boxes blank for normal stations - those refer to extra characters required for out-of-country operation as in XE3/W1AW or W1AW/MM, where the boxes would be completed with the XE3 or MM without the slant bars and used for proper on-air station ID when contacting your station via the email return path.


Click Send. Make the connection to the network via telnet, packet or HF to send the message to the system. After the system processes your message a reply will be sent back to you confirming your settings. This may take a few minutes.

 

7.3. OPTIONS MESSAGE

 

This is what the Options Message created in the figure above would look like as posted in the AirMail outbox.

 

 

7.4. PACLINK OPTIONS MESSAGE

The message format shown above may also be used with Paclink to send a System Options message, but the “To” line must include the full address as in “SYSTEM@winlink.org” since in the above example AirMail actually adds the “@winlink.org” automatically when the message is posted. Paclink does not unless the full address is made into an address book entry in the email application used.

 

 

 

8. WHITELIST OPERATION

Beginning August 1, 2008 all users with amateur call signs will have their whitelist feature activated. Using the whitelist will no longer be optional. Whitelist rejection notices will no longer be sent. This only affects messages coming into the WL2K network from the public internet side.


Any message to a WL2K client from the Internet must be from a sender's address or domain name that is in the recipient's whitelist or else the sender must include the special character sequence (see the WL2K whitelist user notice) in the subject line of the message. If the special character sequence is found in the subject line, the message will be accepted and forwarded to all of the recipients of the message on the WL2K network. A “Reject” entry in the whitelist will still block any message from the blocked address or domain.


If the sender is not in the recipient's whitelist, and no special character sequence is found in the subject line, the message will be rejected with a reference to the Winlink Web page where instructions for sending WL2K messages will be found. Whitelist notices of rejected mail will no longer be created and forwarded to intended recipients.

 

USING THE WHITELIST:

 

NOTE: Again, the Whitelist will contain all e-mail addresses sent FROM your Winlink e-mail address, and retain these Internet e-mail addresses for a period of 400 days from your last e-mail to that address. You may also send a special message to activate, delete, or reject an e-mail address. This is described below. 

 

From inside the system, sending the following message To: SYSTEM with Subject: WHITELIST will assist you in controlling your own individual Whitelist. In the message body, the following options are available. In the message body of this special message, you may put the following:

 

LIST: - will return a list of all whitelist entries for the user. 

 

ACCEPT: jblow@somewhere.com - will allow messages from jblow@somewhere.com to be accepted. You may send   multiple lines, each containing one e-mail address.

 

REJECT: jblow@somewhere.com - will reject any messages from jblow@somewhere.com. You may send multiple lines, each containing one e-mail address.

 

DELETE: jblow@somewhere.com - will remove jblow@somewhere.com from the Whitelist.  You may send multiple lines, each containing one e-mail address per line.

 

IMPORTANT NOTE: Domain Entries without the "@" will be treated as "domain names" only. For example if "ACCEPT: arrl.org" were entered, then ANY message from that "domain name" (arrl.org) would be accepted. 

 

Again, your individual Whitelist is updated continuously and will continuously build history.

 

An example of such a message to control the Whitelist:

 

 

 

9. MESSAGE CLASSES

9.1 CLASS 1 - STANDARD ARRL TEXT RADIOGRAMS

9.1.1 PLAIN TEXT RADIOGRAMS

ARRL Radiograms in the standard MPG format may be transported via radio-email, entered in plain text into the body text, or in attached text files, when sending such radio-email to other ARES® or NTS stations. Multiple individual Radiograms are separated by at least one blank line, may be composed in an editor such as Notepad™ for file attachment, and may be read by all ARES® and NTS stations. Booking format may be used by agreement with the receiving station in order to save repetitive entries of common parts. Such content may be cross-filed between ARES® and the NTS as desired, and the content may be handled on manual nets since the ARRL format is preserved. (For large volumes of bulk traffic, use the Batch File Format for transport to the NTSD. See below.) Note the “NTS”, content and confirmation request in the Subject line. Example:

 

 

To: [target station]@winlink.org

Cc:

Subject: NTS 2 CT; please HXC this email

 

(body text)

NTS 2 CT, text file attached.

73, [name], [call sign]

 

(Attached file.)

 

10 R W1HQ 5 NEWINGTON CT OCT 15

JOHN DOE W1AW

225 MAIN ST

NEWINGTON CT 06111

860 594 0200

BT

GREETINGS FROM THE HQ CLUB

BT

AL W1HQ

 

11 R W1HQ ARL 9 NEWINGTON CT OCT 15

JOHN DOE W1AW

225 MAIN ST

NEWINGTON CT 06111

860 594 0200

BT

ARL FORTY SEVEN 123 OCT

15 0930 X 73

BT

AL W1HQ

 

9.1.2 NTSD BATCH FILES

ARRL Radiograms in the standard MPG format may be transported via radio-email, entered in the Batch File Format in the body text or attached in text files, to send bulk importable traffic to NTSD MBO Winlink Classic stations. Booking is NOT permitted. The Batch File format permits the NTSD MBO operator to import the Batch File directly into the MBO software without using copy and paste methods. The Batch File requires a routing line and information line ahead of each Radiogram, and an ending marker line. Batch Files may be created in an editor such as Notepad™ for preparing attachments, and may be read by any ARES®, NTS or NTSD operator. Plain text and Batch File formatted messages may NOT be mixed in the same file. Avoid sending plain text Radiograms to NTSD stations unless connecting directly to the MBO where you will be prompted for the special lines. See the NTS Radiogram Batch File Format below.

 

9.2 CLASS 2 - RADIO-EMAIL - WITH NETWORK ADDRESSES

9.2.1 STANDARD EMAIL FORMAT

Radio-email may be posted via WL2K to other WL2K clients and public internet addressees. Multiple addressees, multiple copies and binary attachments are permitted. Content format is the standard email format (as opposed to the inclusion of plain text Radiograms or Batch Files as noted for Class 1 traffic). Customary Subject line information is used, and the confirmation request may be used as desired (there is no automatic confirmation of delivery option possible on WL2K radio email). Such formats may be directly imported from official’s computers, or the entire radio-email may be created on official’s computers with the desired message format file attached.

 

9.2.2 ALTERNATIVE MESSAGE FORMATS

Since binary compressed attachments are permitted with radio-email, message formats such as ICS-213 and others may be entered in the body text in text form, or may be attached as files in raw form. Such formats may be directly imported from official’s computers, or the entire radio-email may be created on official’s computers with the desired message format file attached. Such radio-email may be addressed to Target Stations on WL2K or the public internet.

 

If messages containing content such as text ICS-213 messages are to be subsequently handled by relay stations on manual voice or CW NTS nets, the text must have the appropriate punctuation substitutions made, and a preamble and address must be added for network tracking. The preamble and address may be removed from the message at the final receiving station prior to delivery if desired.

 

The ICS-213 or other forms are not to be used for NTS/NTSD public or welfare traffic. Use the standard ARRL Radiogram form in plain text or Batch File format, or radio-email addressed to designated Target Stations or the internet, for public and welfare traffic.

 

Example:

 

To: [target station]@winlink.org,[target internet address]

Cc:

Subject: Podunk Situation report 2300Z; please HXC this email

 

(body text)

[Standard email text or text form of ICS-213, etc.]

 

(attached file)

[ICS-213 or other forms, document file, image file, etc.; no .exe or .zip files.]

 

9.3 CLASS 3 - RADIO-EMAIL - NO NETWORK ADDRESS (NEW)

A hybrid form of radio-email transport may be used in which the body text (and attachments where practical) contains email formatted content, but which has an address typical of an ARRL Radiogram, i.e., name, address, town/state/zip and phone number. Such messages obviously can not be sent directly to the addressee on WL2K or the internet, and may not be handled on manual ARES®, NTS, or NTSD nets.

 

Such radio-email may be sent via WL2K to a designated Target Station capable of using the address to make a manual delivery of the content, or perhaps obtain an email address from the addressee for delivering the message in digital form. The name, address, town/state/zip and phone number shall be entered as the first lines of the radio-email body text, and the Subject line marked “EMAIL MSG [destination quantity]”.

 

This is a new form of extended radiogram format requiring knowledge on the part of the handling stations regarding selection of the ultimate delivering Target Station. This mode may not be used for standard NTSD or NTS manual network traffic due to the email formatted text. Example:

 

 

To: [target station]@winlink.org, or [internet address]

Cc:

Subject: EMAIL MSG CT 1

 

(body text)

To:

[name title call sign]

[street address]

[town state zip]

[phone number]

(blank line)

[Text in standard email format.]

 

(attached file)

[Binary attachments.]

 

9.4 CLASS 4 - RADIO-EMAIL AND RADIOGRAMS FOR RE-FILING (NEW)

Packet and HF AirMail transfer directly between stations is made possible by the appropriate selection made to the “Post Via” box when creating an AirMail message and the connection choice made in the respective terminal window. In such cases, the address entries in the To: and Cc: boxes may contain the “re-file” information and will cause the message to be posted in the recipient’s Transit Folder. Manual re-filing will be required except when using advanced routing table choices in AirMail, hence a simple method to transport the desired re-filing address as the first lines in the body text is discussed below. In the case of Radiograms, the re-file address is an integral part of each Radiogram and is obvious. For email to be re-filed onto WL2K or the internet, the addresses included in the body text may be copied and pasted in new radio-email messages.

 

9.4.1 DESTINATION RE-FILING ADDRESS - RADIOGRAMS

ARRL Radiogram messages transported via client-to-client transfers (using AirMail packet or HF, typically with the call sign of the Target Station in the “To” block) with intended final ARRL Radiogram addresses, may be re-filed by any means into the NTS or NTSD as appropriate. The Radiograms may be included in the body text, or in attached files as plain text or Batch File formats. The Subject line should be marked as either “NTS [destination quantity]” or “NTSD [destination quantity]” as appropriate, and the “please HXC this email” confirmation request should be included. Such messages are handled like Class 1 Radiogram traffic after re-filing.

 

9.4.2 DESTINATION RE-FILING ADDRESS - EMAIL

Email formatted messages transported via client-to-client transfers (using AirMail packet or HF, typically with the call sign of the Target Station in the “To” block) with intended final WL2K network or public internet addresses, may be re-filed onto WL2K or the internet. The ultimate addresses for network re-filing shall be contained as the first lines in the body text of the radio-email, introduced by “REFILE:”, “To: [list]” and “Cc: [list]”, and with “REFILE EMAIL” noted in the Subject line. There may be multiple re-file “To” and “Cc” addresses, WL2K and internet addresses included as needed. Such messages may contain regular email content, or alternatives such as ICS-213 forms, in body text or attachments. These messages may not be handled on the manual NTS or NTSD networks.

 

 

To: [direct transfer target station]

Cc:

Subject: REFILE EMAIL

 

(body text)

Refile:

To: [target station]@winlink.org, [target internet address]

Cc:

Subject: Podunk disaster supply list.

(blank line)

[standard email text]

 

(attached file)

[binary attachments as needed]

 

 

10. NTS RADIOGRAM BATCH FILE FORMAT

The format for creating a Batch File of NTS Radiograms which may be imported into Winlink Classic MBO software is as follows (this is the batch format exported from Winlink Classic and the format which may also be used by ARES® or NTS stations to originate Batch Files with text editors at shelters in the field). Fill in the information between the brackets shown here only to identify the entry. The brackets are not used in the Batch File:

 

 

ST [zip] @ NTS[st] < [station of origin]

[town] [area code] [prefix]

(blank line for readability optional)

[preamble line]

[address lines]

BT

[text lines]

BT

[signature line]

(blank line for readability optional)

/EX

 

For each additional message included, the next message’s “ST” line must follow immediately after the /EX of the previous message, without a blank line (mandatory).

Notes:

·         The first line of the message frame, and the file, is the standard NTSD BBS “To” line entry beginning with ST [zip] @ NTS[st], where [zip] is the addressee’s 5 digit zip code and [st] is the addressee’s state two letter abbreviation. The optional < [station of origin] entry indicates the source of the message. A single space must follow ST. A single space may follow [zip] and @ for readability. The NTS[st] must be one group, as in NTSCO or NTSMD. Example ST 21201@NTSMD, or ST 21201 @ NTSMD.

·         The second line is [town] [area code] [prefix]. The prefix is often omitted in the NTS but can be very useful in Sections with large numbers of prefixes, some toll free and others not, for downloading stations to consider. (This line is sometimes introduced with “QTC” but this is not required for this export/import format.)

·         The Preamble, Address, Text and Signature are in the standard ARRL radiogram format (MPG-1, PSCM Appendix B), entered as one or more single Radiograms, each with its own ST, town and /EX lines.

·         Booking is not permitted without special permission. Create Batch Files with individual messages only.

·         The Text is framed at start and end by the break (BT) on a separate line each.

·         The message ends after the signature with the /EX entry on the last line by itself.

·         If an additional message is to follow, enter the ST line of the next message on the next line immediately after the preceding /EX line. There must be no blank line between the ST and /EX. (A blank line or end-of-file after /EX will terminate the file import.)

·         Filename: Batch Files saved to disk and attached to radio-emails must be saved in the 8 by 3 filename format to accommodate NTSD stations using older operating systems (the short name FAT file system); as in W1AW0909.TXT.

·         Confirm the transaction: Enter into the Subject line of the carrying email “NTSD [quantity destination]” (for large Batch Files the destinations may be omitted), and “please HXC this email” to request a confirmation of receipt reply message from the Target addressee.

 

10.1 EXAMPLE - BATCH FILE MESSAGES:

 

 

To: [Target Station Address]

Cc:

Subject: NTSD 2 CT; please HXC this email

 

(body text)

NTSD 2 CT attached.

 

(attached file)

 

ST 06111@NTSCT

NEWINGTON 860 594

 

10 R W1HQ 5 NEWINGTON CT OCT 15

JOHN DOE W1AW

225 MAIN ST

NEWINGTON CT 06111

860 594 0200

BT

GREETINGS FROM THE HQ CLUB

BT

AL W1HQ

 

/EX

ST 06111@NTSCT

NEWINGTON 860 594

 

11 R W1HQ ARL 9 NEWINGTON CT OCT 15

JOHN DOE W1AW

225 MAIN ST

NEWINGTON CT 06111

860 594 0200

BT

ARL FORTY SEVEN 123 OCT

15 0930 X 73

BT

AL W1HQ

 

/EX

 

 

11. TARGET STATIONS

Targets are WL2K client station call sign and Tactical addresses listed to provide routing for WL2K radio-email by location and/or function. Primary Section Targets, and additional Targets at the discretion of the Section staff, and Primary NTS/NTSD Targets, will be shared nationally via a private database. The national database will be dynamic; hence a Section and the NTS/NTSD may rapidly change Target assignments or establish ad-hoc Targets for coordinating ARESMAT deployment or handling large traffic loading, etc. Target Stations check their access to the network at least daily, thus confirming the functionality of the national networking.

 

11.1 SECTION TARGETS

Sections may assign one or more Primary Section Target Stations which can monitor WL2K daily, or more often as required, for contact and alerts from anywhere in the US. The Primary station(s) should be able to check WL2K for mail via internet, packet and HF gateways as needed, and be able to communicate with the Section staff at all times, with or without local infrastructure. Different stations may be listed for internet, packet, or HF network access as needed. The Primary Targets with packet and HF should be capable of direct AirMail transfers.

 

The Section staff may assign additional Section Target Stations for the national listing as deemed necessary, such as contacts for ARES®, NTS, agencies, or nets, etc.

 

Additional Targets may be assigned and listed locally within Sections as needed for use by other Section stations or shared with other nearby Sections under EMCOMM MOUs. The Section Target list typically would include stations representing each of the district and local jurisdictions, key agencies and EOCs, plus each of the Gateway and backbone resources available.

 

11.2 NTS - NTSD TARGETS

The NTS will assign Primary Target Stations for the national listing to be used for the transfer of all classes of traffic as needed based upon their function in the NTS. Other NTS stations equipped for radio-email may check into their nets indicating that they are WL2K capable in order to permit the exchange of traffic dispatched from those nets, or to meet liaison or TCC schedules. Additional Targets in the NTS may be assigned by Area Staff for NTS/NTSD traffic sharing as needed.

 

The NTSD will assign Primary Target Stations for the national listings which are willing and equipped to accept Batch Files for bulk transfer of agency and public traffic from other NTS, NTSD and ARES® stations anywhere on a 24/7 basis. The NTSD MBO stations may use radio-email for the transfer and exchange of sorted batches of Radiogram traffic via WL2K or client-to-client transfers via AirMail on packet or HF PacTor. Additional Targets in the NTSD may be assigned by Area Staff for NTS/NTSD traffic sharing as needed.

 

The transfer of ARRL Radiograms via radio-email will be confirmed by reply message.

 

The current policy of the NTS/NTSD (2009) is that standard ARRL Radiogram traffic shall be routed via regular NTS routes and NTSD unless such are temporarily not functioning or not available due to propagation difficulties. During emergencies in any area of the country, NTS/NTSD radio-email transfers of messaging in bulk may be conducted to relieve the loading on manual nets or MBOs.

 

___________________________________________________

Page last updated OCT 19, 2009

MDCWL2KOVwAM.htm

“Windows” operating system and “Notepad” references are trademarks of Microsoft.

ARES® is a trademark of the ARRL, Newington, CT

© W3YVQ SEP 2005-2009, all rights reserved